826 Students Write the Power of Inclusion

November 27, 2019

Sharing their advice on building inclusive spaces and writing narrative responses that demonstrate the power of inclusion. That’s what 826 chapters and students across the country did this fall as part of “Include Someone, Make a Difference,” our latest collaboration with Cartoon Network’s Stop Bullying: Speak Up initiative and PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center

Throughout National Bullying Prevention Month powerful student responses were sparked by an original lesson: “Include Someone, Make A Difference”. Available on 826 Digital, the lesson focuses on building empathy and communication through writing and encourages students to consider multiple perspectives, solve challenges through inclusive acts, and stop bullying before it starts. 

Inspired by familiar and beloved characters from Cartoon Network’s animated series We Bare Bears, Teen Titans: Go!, and Craig of the Creek, students thought of creative solutions to tricky problems like bullying and exclusion. By inviting original endings to the cliffhanger challenges presented in original Cartoon Network storyboards, activities in the lesson highlight the myriad ways we can work to stop bullying. The lesson also centers the spotlight on the creative, essential voices students bring to the conversation.

Post-workshop, students were asked to amplify their voice by sharing their stories and what they’ve learned with someone in their world. Here are a few examples from student writers across the 826 Network:

“Robin and Raven were making a group project. Beast Boy was full of excitement and messed up the project. Raven and Robin were mad. But later, they understood he was full of excitement and were happy. Everyone was happy. And then he turned into an animal.”

  • Ana R., Grade 2, 826NYC 

“Chloe went to Panda. They became friends. Chloe said, “I’m sorry.” Panda said, “OK, you want to be friends?” Chloe said, “OK.” Grizz and Ice Bear become friends. Then they all got friends.”

  • Leyat, Grade 1, 826 MSP

“At first, Handlebar did not want to listen to them, but eventually he reflected Craig’s sad expression when he realized he had hurt Craig’s feelings. 

“I’m so sorry for treating you like that. Will you forgive me?”

“Of course,” said Craig. “Friends have their disagreements at times, but really good friends know how to forgive.”

  • Gabriela T., Grade 8, 826 Valencia

You can view more writing responses from students across the country by visiting 826 Digital and browsing the Writing Gallery. In addition, you can bring this writing opportunity to life by sharing the lesson with students in any learning space. You can also see the animated story by Tesa, a third-grader from Georgia who participated in the “Stop Bullying: Speak Up Writing Challenge.” Her story aired on Cartoon Network this fall! Read more about Tesa and her story with Cartoon Network and 826 National.

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